Archive | August, 2017

Brexit Bells (with apologies to Godley and Creme)

21 Aug

We should have told EU all we wanted was to have some fun (To have some fun)

But EU wanted us to be the permanent one (The permanent one), yes EU did,

Now when we’re in negotiations or at the back of the bazaar, EU always stops us when we go too far,

We should have known EU’d always keep us waiting for those Brexit bells (Brexit bells)

Those Brexit bells (Brexit bells)

 

Oh we could talk all night but EU won’t understand (Don’t talk to us in French today)

The only words EU wants to hear are ‘Do you take this deal?’ (In French today)

Does the lull in conversation mean the penny’s droppin’?

EU should have known we were sceptically shoppin’

It’s our foolish way of sayin’ EU’s the one stoppin’ those Brexit bells (Brexit bells)

Those Brexit bells (Brexit bells)

And like a square peg in a round hole, we don’t belong here baby

Don’t need a fanfare or a bell peal to tell EU baby

We won’t belong to EU baby …..

 

Oh we say it’s not important but we know what EU’s thinkin’

Cause every time the EU publishes papers we feel EU openness stingin’

In the back of our mind we know it’s the EU who’ll be ringing those Brexit bells (Brexit bells)

Those Brexit bells

We should have told EU all we wanted was to have some fun (Taking back control)

But EU wanted us to be the permanent one (That was yesterday)

Oh we’d do it but imperial measures are worth the pain

We’re gonna to run out of track before we got on the train

Can’t you hear the sound of an economy snappin’ under the strain of those Brexit bells (Brexit bells)

Those Brexit bells (Brexit bells), Brexit bells (Brexit bells)

 

 

 

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Innovation goes together with representation

9 Aug

In the wake of the now-infamous Google memo, some have argued that whether or not its author should have been fired, is a hard question to answer, because of the company’s commitment to open discussion.  I’m not sure that this is such a hard question to answer.  The memo proposed that women were intrinsically less attracted to, and less capable of, coding careers than men.  It argued that biology explained the lack of women in technology firms and their comparative absence at senior levels.   If you believe that companies embody a set values and create a working culture – and technology giants with their global missions and highly-designed office spaces, do this more self-consciously than many – then contravening central tenets of that culture has to be problematic at best.

Google aims to bring its products to all, and it has already had to confront its lack of internal diversity publicly.  Publication of its staffing ratios (69% of all workers are male and only 20% of technical jobs are held women; 2% of employees are African American) has led to open discussion of diversity issues, and to pledges to improve the picture.  Google, furthermore, has been embroiled in a potential legal challenge around sex discrimination and the gender pay gap, which the US Department of Labour has described as showing ‘extreme’ disparities.  In this atmosphere, what the firm is seen to do in response to reductionist arguments about who is good at tech, is crucial to its reputation.  Complacency is not an option.  As a former Google employee forcefully argued, publishing a memo that suggests that part of the workforce (the female part) is intrinsically unsuited to its work, and is present for politically correct reasons, has consequences for both the author of the memo, and for the company.  In publishing the memo, the author has made it very challenging to assign collaborative work to him; nor could a manager easily put women in his team, after he has said what he has said. And having put in place the conditions for a ‘textbook hostile working environment’ the only realistic choice was to remove the author from his job. Meanwhile the company has to deal with internal dismay in its workforce, and external reputational damage.

What would the alternative be?  To leave the man in his place and educate him about just how flawed his arguments are? This seems pretty hard in situation where the author overlooks that there are systemic and cultural reasons why women may not be thriving in tech.  As the FT put it today, ‘It is clear from history and social science that bias and inequity do have an effect on the composition of the workforce’ – in other words women and other minorities have been affected by factors in the wider system, not inherent deficiencies in themselves.

Looking beyond Google to the wider tech sector, there is ample evidence that more diverse workforces are possible. The role of women in the history of computing has recently been highlighted in the film ‘Hidden Figures’, and celebration of Ada Lovelace’s pivotal work at the dawn of computer science.  In Russia and Asia, women are employed in greater numbers in technology and engineering than in the USA (or the UK for that matter), again disproving the argument that women are somehow intrinsically less capable of such work. And a Guardian article on Monday showed how Silicon Valley has been less successful in integrating minority ethnic groups, than the technology companies around Washington DC, where 17% of technical workers are black.  In California, technology companies are failing to recruit to reflect either the local Latino population, or the smaller proportion of African Americans. So the West coast tech sector is particularly white and male.  Public commitment to increasing diversity is part of the coda of Google (and its Silicon Valley cohabitants) – it knows that it has a problem and that it needs to be addressed.  The memo has probably made doing so all the more difficult, at least in the short-term.

And the case for Google and others diversifying their workforce isn’t simply to do with equality and social justice. In marketing technological products to us, Google needs to know that they meet consumer requirements.  The papers are full of examples of where this capacity has been limited by a professional monoculture  – e.g. voice recognition software tested by men, which struggles with women’s voices; facial recognition systems which work less well with darker skin tones. And in terms of general innovation there’s a growing literature to show that diverse teams come up with better, more original solutions to problems, than groups of similar people from similar backgrounds.  So diversity is a scientific and commercial necessity, not just a ‘nice to have’ option.  It is somewhat ironic that the kind of collaborative and interactive skills which the memo defined as ‘female’ characteristics, are exactly the ones that tech companies must have in order to innovate and compete….

 

 

 

 

 

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